Archive for October, 2014

59 Reasons Living In Sydney Ruins You For Life

59 Reasons Living In Sydney Ruins You For Life.

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Integrating social impact management and stakeholder relations, by Richard Parsons | csrconnect.ed – the ACCSR blog

As corporate social responsibility CSR has matured, many concepts and tools have been developed to help manage particular aspects of it. We now speak not only of CSR but also of social impact assessment SIA, social impact management planning, stakeholder engagement, social licence, social return on investment, social accounting, integrated reporting, and materiality analysis. And that’s before we start talking about sustainability. Perhaps this is a sign that we now understand CSR more deeply, as we seek to understand its every nuance.

Yet this fragmentation risks a situation in which we select only the tools we are most comfortable with, and ignore others. These choices signify how we conceptualise the social dimension, choices that may overlook or downplay “difficult” aspects of CSR and stakeholder relations. Arguably, it is no longer necessary for practitioners to reflect deeply on their organisations’ moral responsibilities and relationships with societal groups, as long as they know how to navigate an

Read More at: Integrating social impact management and stakeholder relations, by Richard Parsons | csrconnect.ed – the ACCSR blog.

The barefoot ‘solar engineer’: An illiterate grandma’s journey to save her Sabah village | Malaysia | Mobile | The Malay Mail Online

Like most villagers, they farm their own vegetables like sweet potato and tapioca to eat and occasionally feed the leftovers to the free-range chickens and pigs running around the lush, green hills between the sparsely populated village punctuated with log bridges around the Magandai river.They prepare dinner using the dim glow of a diesel lamp, and retire early most nights.

On Sundays, they go to the church atop a grassy hill, which offers a stunning view of the vast surrounding land.The village, though picturesque, is cut off from most basic necessities like electricity, water, health care and education, mainly because it takes at least a five-hour bone-rattling drive to the nearest village of Kota Marudu — and that is only with the elements of daylight and good weather.The long, arduous trek out to the town is made only when absolutely necessary, or when villagers have business to attend to.

Each trip out of the village on a chartered four-wheel-drive vehicle costs about RM40 each way.It is this remoteness, inaccessibility and poverty that has qualified the village for this “Grandma Solar Engineer” programme from Barefoot College, a non-governmental organisation based in western India that helps empower marginalised women worldwide and gives them a boost to drive their local village economy in a sustainable way.

The village of Sonsogun Magandai in northern Sabah is a five-hour drive through rough terrains from Kota Marudu, October 4, 2014. — Picture courtesy of Sabah Women Entrepreneurs and Professionals AssociationThe village of Sonsogun Magandai in northern Sabah is a five-hour drive through rough terrains from Kota Marudu, October 4, 2014.

The programme, running since 2004, teaches illiterate older women from rural communities how to fabricate, install, repair and maintain solar lighting units.They will learn how to handle sophisticated charge controllers, to install solar panels and link them to batteries and to build solar lanterns and later assemble and install such units in their own villages.

With local partners Sabah Women Entrepreneurs and Professionals Association SWEPA, Asian Forestry Company Sabah AFCS, Raleigh International, Partners of Community Organisations in Sabah, GEF Small Grants Programme — UNDP, Sabah Credit Corporation and the state and federal governments, the Barefoot Solar Project identified the village and three grandmothers to be part of the project.

The two other potential participants had to drop out for health and personal reasons.“I’m just so grateful that I get to have this experience, even after the other ladies dropped out. I’m sure they will regret not taking the opportunity.

READ MORE —> The barefoot ‘solar engineer’: An illiterate grandma’s journey to save her Sabah village | Malaysia | Mobile | The Malay Mail Online.

Drowning the dreams of indigenous Malaysians – Features – Al Jazeera English

For decades, the 50-year-old ethnic Penan woman and her reclusive tribe lived quietly in the mist-swept jungles of central Borneo.

Her husband, like most Penan men, would hunt for food during the day, scouring the forest armed with spears and poisonous darts, while she weaved rattan handicrafts for local trade.But everything changed in 1998 when they were evicted to make way for the largest hydropower project in Southeast Asia – the Bakun dam. Now she lives in a decaying resettlement site encircled by oil palm plantations. Year by year, they have fallen deeper into poverty.”The government made us sweet promises so we came, but now we are suffering,” said Layo, squatting on the creaky terrace of a wooden longhouse. “We have no money, no food, and no forest.”Layo said the Sarawak state government promised them a good life, with 10 acres of farmland, good schools, free electricity and clean water supplies. Instead, each family received a small plot of land as far as 15km away from their resettlement site. Layo’s husband couldn’t afford the daily travel costs and now works as a labourer for a local timber company. She can’t earn a living because there is no source of rattan nearby.”Before we could get everything from the river and the forest, but here everything is about money,” Layo explained. “They cut off our water supply when we couldn’t afford to pay.”

READ MORE –> Drowning the dreams of indigenous Malaysians – Features – Al Jazeera English.

“A price on the environment does not mean a commodification of the environment”Documentation from the seminar with Pavan Sukhdev | Global Utmaning Global Challenge

Putting a price on the environment is not about commodifying the Earth and valuing natural resources is not about creating simple cost-benefit models for the entire world. Valuing natural resources is about counteracting the economic invisibility of nature. An invisibility that leads to poor policies and treaties. These were some of the messages from Pavan Sukhdev, previous Head of UNEP’s Green Economy Initiative, when he attended a seminar on May 9th that was arranged by Global Challenge and Stockholm Environment Institute.

via “A price on the environment does not mean a commodification of the environment”Documentation from the seminar with Pavan Sukhdev | Global Utmaning Global Challenge.